Rockford Files Star James Garner dead at 86

I used to love watching that show’s reruns on TV.

LOS ANGELES –  Actor James Garner, whose whimsical style in the 1950s TV Western “Maverick” led to a stellar career in TV and films such as “The Rockford Files” and his Oscar-nominated “Murphy’s Romance,” has died, police said. He was 86.

He was found dead of natural causes at his home in the Brentwood area of Los Angeles Saturday evening, Los Angeles police officer Alonzo Iniquez said early Sunday.

Police responded to a call around 8 p.m. PDT and confirmed Garner’s identity from family members, Iniquez told The Associated Press.

There was no immediate word on a more specific cause of death. Garner had suffered a stroke in May 2008, just weeks after his 80th birthday

via Movie, television legend James Garner dies at 86 | Fox News.

Theme music from the Rockford Files:

Rest in Peace James, thanks for the childhood memories. :)

 

Condolences to Greg Gutfeld

I admit it, I sometimes like to watch Red Eye on Fox News. It’s a light-hearted break from the seriousness of rest of the news day. So, hearing that Greg lost his Mother is rather heartbreaking to hear. It is something that I will have to deal with myself one day. :(

My Thoughts and Prayers are with Greg and the rest of the Gutfeld Family.

(H/T to Reason’s Hit Run)

David Yeagley RIP

A Warrior has died.

The sad news:

Dear Friends of Bad Eagle,

On behalf of the Yeagley family, I am sorry to inform you that David passed away early yesterday morning, March 11, 2014.

We await the glorious resurrection when we shall see him again.

A memorial service is planned for Friday, March 14 at 3:00 pm at Oklahoma City Central Seventh-day Adventist Church located at 4747 NW 63rd St.

The family plans to hold a second memorial service in Oklahoma City in the future, details to be posted at a later date.

via Friends of Bad Eagle.

(Via Conservative Heritage Times)

Bartcop RIP

I’m not supposed to do this; but, screw it. This is MY blog and I will do what I damned well please. :mad: If you got a problem with it, that is just too damned bad.

A pioneer in the liberal blogging and political snark world has died. BartCop is who he was. Crooks and Liars has the story.

He leaves behind a wife and a mortgage. Click here to go help out.

This chorus is swirling in my head at the moment:

And when I’m gone, just carry on, don’t mourn
Rejoice every time you hear the sound of my voice
Just know that I’m looking down on you smiling
And I didn’t feel a thing, So baby don’t feel no pain
Just smile back

The Video:

As most who read here know; I was not always a Buchananite Conservative. I was, for what it is truly worth; a very skeptical left-of-center type. A Populist, of the historic sort. In 2007, I basically decided that voting Democratic Party was not for me any longer. Because of this, I do mourn, when a blogger dies. A voice in this great conversation is silenced. Maybe this video here, will explain what I mean:

I just wish politics was a bit more, like it is depicted in the video above, towards the end. :(

May he rest in peace. :(

Others: LiberalandThe BRAD BLOG and Balloon Juice

Pete Seeger RIP

Some of you might be shocked that I would remember this man. However, as you know, I was not always a Conservative. Furthermore, Pete Seeger stood up to, and won out against the McCarthyism of the 1950’s. Something that I, as someone who believes in freedom of thought; believe was wrong-headed.

Peter Seeger — May he rest in peace.

My Favorite of his:

Repose en paix. Bon homme, vous avez plus de gagné.

Update: Ann Althouse remembers Seeger:

“I think these are very improper questions for any American to be asked, especially under such compulsion as this,” said Pete Seeger, in 1955, subpoenaed to testify before a thing we used to have called the House Un-American Activities Committee. They thought he was a Communist, and he was a communist. “With a small ‘c,'” he liked to say. He’d been a Communist with a capital C too, but he’d quit, and he said he should have quit earlier. 

[…]
Much more in the long NYT article at the link, including his education at Harvard; his encounter with the folklorist Alan Lomax, and, through Lomax, Lead Belly; his alliance with Woody Guthrie, traveling around playing for migrant workers in 1940; his WWII-era group the Almanac Singers, who played anti-war and then antifascist songs; campaigning for presidential candidate Henry Wallace in 1948; his central place in the great folk music revival circa 1960; playing “We Shall Overcome” at Civil Rights Movement rallies; and getting betrayed by Bob Dylan.

Imagine experiencing nearly a century of American history from such a central place. What a lucky man. Pete Seeger lived to be 94.

Amen.

Related:

Others Remembering: americanthinker.comNPRAlthouseGuardianOutside the BeltwayAssociated Press,American PowerLiberalandUltimate Classic RockThe WeekSky DancingThe AgonistLawyers, Guns & Money and Maggie’s FarmDaily DotThe Political CarnivalThe Agonist and The Moderate Voicealicublog and The Jawa Report

The Tuesday Music Express – Special Memorial Edition – Presents: Woody Guthrie

No Christmas tree was ever again allowed in Mary Krainatz’s Upper Peninsula home.

The sight of a decorated fir tree, resplendent with colorful ornaments, yuletide cheers and the gaiety of children, reminded her of a Christmas Eve she longed to forget.

Seventy-three people, the majority of them children younger than 10, died in a stampede after someone supposedly yelled “fire” during a holiday get-together for striking miners in Calumet on Dec. 24, 1913. Krainatz’s 11-year-old daughter, also named, Mary, was among those killed when people rushed for the staircase down to the first floor.

Today is the 100th anniversary of the tragedy, a time of remembrance in a small Copper Country community where no survivors remain to share their firsthand accounts.

A ceremony, including a reading of the names of the deceased, will be held at 3:30 p.m. at the site of where the Italian Hall once stood at Seventh and Elm. Now, a park is punctuated by the sandstone block archway that once served as the building’s entrance. A white, silk lily for each victim pays silent testament in Calumet’s Village Hall.

The pre-holiday horror was immortalized in the Woody Guthrie song “1913 Massacre,” a 2001 opera, a book by Birmingham lawyer Steve Lehto and the documentary “Red Metal: The Copper Country Strike of 1913” that debuted on PBS earlier this month. — Source

This posting is dedicated to the 73 people who lost their lives on December 24, 1913 in Calumet, Michigan. May they rest in peace.

May this be a reminder to all my Conservative and Tea Party friends that dishonest, crony capitalism hurts people; this being a perfect example.

Nelson Mandela RIP

A civil rights leader has passed.

Via NYT:

Nelson Mandela, who led the emancipation of South Africa from white minority rule and served as his country’s first black president, becoming an international emblem of dignity and forbearance, died Thursday. He was 95.

The South African president, Jacob Zuma, announced Mr. Mandela’s death.

Mr. Mandela had long declared he wanted a quiet exit, but the time he spent in a Pretoria hospital in recent months was a clamor of quarreling family, hungry news media, spotlight-seeking politicians and a national outpouring of affection and loss. The vigil even eclipsed a recent visit by President Obama, who paid homage to Mr. Mandela but decided not to intrude on the privacy of a dying man he considered his hero.

Mr. Mandela will be buried, according to his wishes, in the village of Qunu, where he grew up. The exhumed remains of three of his children were reinterred there in early July under a court order, resolving a family squabble that had played out in the news media.

Mr. Mandela’s quest for freedom took him from the court of tribal royalty to the liberation underground to a prison rock quarry to the presidential suite of Africa’s richest country. And then, when his first term of office was up, unlike so many of the successful revolutionaries he regarded as kindred spirits, he declined a second term and cheerfully handed over power to an elected successor, the country still gnawed by crime, poverty, corruption and disease but a democracy, respected in the world and remarkably at peace.

The question most often asked about Mr. Mandela was how, after whites had systematically humiliated his people, tortured and murdered many of his friends, and cast him into prison for 27 years, he could be so evidently free of spite.

The government he formed when he finally won the chance was an improbable fusion of races and beliefs, including many of his former oppressors. When he became president, he invited one of his white wardens to the inauguration. Mr. Mandela overcame a personal mistrust bordering on loathing to share both power and a Nobel Peace Prize with the white president who preceded him, F. W. de Klerk.

Reactions via CNN:

President Barack Obama:

“Nelson Mandela lived for that ideal, and he made it real. He achieved more than could be expected of any man. Today, he has gone home. And we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this Earth. He no longer belongs to us – he belongs to the ages.”

Secretary of State John Kerry:

“Nelson Mandela was a stranger to hate. He rejected recrimination in favor of reconciliation and knew the future demands we move beyond the past. He gave everything he had to heal his country and lead it back into the community of nations, including insisting on relinquishing his office and ensuring there would be a peaceful transfer of power. Today, people all around the world who yearn for democracy look to Mandela’s nation and its democratic Constitution as a hopeful example of what is possible.”

Former President George W. Bush:

“Laura and I join the people of South Africa and the world in celebrating the life of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela. President Mandela was one of the great forces for freedom and equality of our time. He bore his burdens with dignity and grace, and our world is better off because of his example. This good man will be missed, but his contributions will live on forever. Laura and I send our heartfelt sympathy to President Mandela’s family and to the citizens of the nation he loved.”

Former President Bill Clinton:

“Today the world has lost one of its most important leaders and one of its finest human beings. And Hillary, Chelsea and I have lost a true friend.”

“His story will remember Nelson Mandela as a champion for human dignity and freedom, for peace and reconciliation. We will remember him as a man of uncommon grace and compassion, for whom abandoning bitterness and embracing adversaries was not just a political strategy but a way of life. Our thoughts and prayers go out to Graça and his family and to the people of South Africa. All of us are living in a better world because of the life that Madiba lived. He proved that there is freedom in forgiving, that a big heart is better than a closed mind, and that life’s real victories must be shared.”

Former President George H. W. Bush:

“Barbara and I mourn the passing of one of the greatest believers in freedom we have had the privilege to know. As President, I watched in wonder as Nelson Mandela had the remarkable capacity to forgive his jailers following 26 years of wrongful imprisonment – setting a powerful example of redemption and grace for us all. He was a man of tremendous moral courage, who changed the course of history in his country. Barbara and I had great respect for President Mandela, and send our condolences to his family and countrymen.”

Former Vice President Al Gore:

“We should take a moment today to bow our heads and pay our respects to an extraordinarily courageous man who truly changed the world for the better and, in the process, inspired us all.”

Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice:

“Throughout history, a few special people have been able to transcend differences and change the world for the better. Nelson Mandela was one of those people who had a vision for human rights and equality. Those beliefs made him the father of multi ethnic democracy in South Africa. All freedom loving people will miss him but we will never forget his sacrifice and his achievements. My prayers and my thoughts are with him and with the people of South Africa.”

Former Secretary of State and retired Gen. Colin Powell:

“After 27 years in prison he was asked upon release if he was bitter, if he wanted to get even with his jailers or oppressors. His simple, but profound answer, was, “If I felt that way I would still be in jail.” His jailers sat in the front row at his inauguration. I will never forget him, nor will the world. My wife and I offer out deepest condolences to his family and the people of South Africa. His spirit lives on.”

National Security Advisor Susan Rice:

“Even as we mourn, we remember how privileged the world was to witness the transformation he wrought by changing minds and hearts. He was apartheid’s captive but never its prisoner, and he rid the world of one of history’s foulest evils by hewing to universal principles for which he hoped to live but was prepared to die. Let us celebrate Madiba’s life by rededicating ourselves to the values and hopes he embodied: reconciliation and justice, freedom and equality, democracy and human rights, an honest reckoning with the past and an unflinching insistence on embracing our common humanity.”

British Prime Minister David Cameron:

“Mandela was not just a hero of our time but of all times… a man that through his dignity has inspired millions.”

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell:

“Elaine and I are deeply saddened by the passing of Nelson Mandela, a man whose skillful guidance of South Africa following the end of the Apartheid regime made him one of the great statesmen of our time and a global symbol of reconciliation. ‘Madiba’s’ patience through imprisonment and insistence on unity over vengeance in the delicate period in which he served stand as a permanent reminder to the world of the value of perseverance and the positive influence one good man or woman can have over the course of human affairs. The world mourns this great leader. May his passing lead to a deeper commitment to reconciliation around the world.”

House Speaker John Boehner:

“Nelson Mandela was an unrelenting voice for democracy and his ‘long walk to freedom’ showed an enduring faith in God and respect for human dignity. His perseverance in fighting the apartheid system will continue to inspire future generations. Mandela led his countrymen through times of epic change with a quiet moral authority that directed his own path from prisoner to president. He passes this world as a champion of peace and racial harmony. I send condolences to the Mandela family and to the people of South Africa.”

2008 Republican presidential nominee and Sen. John McCain of Arizona:

“It is hard not to be in awe of Nelson Mandela. His character is awe-inspiring – his courage, resilience, generosity, selflessness, wisdom. History offers few examples of people who were as devoted or sacrificed more for a cause greater than their self-interest than Nelson Mandela…To forgive when you have been wronged, when you have suffered unjustly at the hands of others, is a hard thing to do. But it is, as Nelson Mandela knew, the most liberating action a person can take. For nations, too, if they are to build a future greater than their history.”

Republican Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina:

“Nelson Mandela was a transformational figure, a man who truly changed the world. He walked a long road to freedom and embraced the fundamental human belief in equality. After his release from prison, his tireless work to reconcile a nation torn apart by centuries of tension and hostility made him one of history’s greatest statesmen. All freedom-loving people mourn his passing.”

Democratic Rep. Barbara Lee of California:

“I am deeply saddened by the passing of Nelson Mandela, and my thoughts and prayers go out to his friends, family, and the people of South Africa. His legacy will live on forever in how we live our lives and fight for freedom and justice in a multi-racial society. We must pause and remember Madiba in his greatness; he used his life not for himself, but for the good of his country and the good of the world, and his spirit will live on.”

Democratic Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney of New York:

“The world lost a selfless leader who spent his life fighting for justice. Madiba’s powerful legacy and shining example of courage and love will continue to inspire countless generations.”

Democratic Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas:

“May the life of Nelson Mandela long stand as the ultimate tribute to the triumph of hope. May it be a comfort to his family, to his friends and loved ones, to the people of South Africa that so many mourn the loss of this extraordinary man and incredible leader at this sad time.”

2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, via Facebook:

“In the modern age, Nelson Mandela will be remembered as an unsurpassed healer of human hearts. By dint of his character, sacrifice, vision and abounding love, he won a revolution without shedding blood, founded a peaceful nation in a land of turmoil, and personified principle in a world searching for integrity.”

Former United States Ambassador to United Nations Andrew Young to CNN’s Wolf Blitzer

“His spiritual presence was far more important than his physical suffering. It seemed as though the more he suffered, the stronger he became spiritually…The one thing that impressed me always about South Africa was that he was not the only one had this spirit. There was a spirit of reconciliation that was a part of the body politic of southern Africa and I think we can build on that in the world.”

Democratic San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, via Facebook:

“Rest in peace, Nelson Mandela. You were a once-in-a-century leader whose teachings about tolerance and acceptance inspired our common humanity.”

New York City Mayor-Elect Bill de Blasio:

“We live in a far better world today because of the life and work of Nelson Mandela. He met hatred with reason, intolerance with resolve… Just months after being released from 27 years of political imprisonment, Nelson Mandela came here to New York City. I will never forget hearing his words at Yankee Stadium, where he told New Yorkers, ‘You the people, never abandoned us.’ We came to believe in his fight for justice and democracy as if it were our own. Our values and activism helped us work toward justice in South Africa, and thereafter in many other parts of the world.”

Chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus Rep. Marcia Fudge of Ohio:

“With incomparable courage, President Mandela overcame violent persecution for his belief that every individual deserved to live in a society where injustice would not be tolerated…His vision for justice in South Africa reflected the vision Members of CBC had for America, and his story empowered African Americans and people of all races to stand up for justice on behalf our brothers and sisters worldwide.”

And now, my thoughts:

Nelson Mandela stood for the institutionalised discrimination in South Africa. My feelings can be summed up in this music video:

Rest in peace, sir. You have more than earned it.

 

The Wednesday Afternoon Music Express, Special Memorial Edition Presents: Alvin Lee

It appears that Alvin Lee finally made it home. :(

Alvin Lee, the guitarist and singer of Ten Years After, has died.

A statement posted on his official website read: “With great sadness we have to announce that Alvin unexpectedly passed away early this morning after unforseen complications following a routine surgical procedure.

“We have lost a wonderful and much loved father and companion, the world has lost a truly great and gifted musician.” — More at Music Radar

 

In Memory: Darlene and Vernon Rhoton

I wanted to take a step back from politics for a second and give you all some bad news. For the last few weeks, we have had some tragic events happen around this household.

My Father’s youngest Sister and her husband of many, many years, have both passed away, within 12 days of one another. Both from cancer.

DarleneandVernon

Darlene and Vernon Rhoton – May they rest in peace. :(

Vernon’s Funeral was just a few days ago and now it’s Darlene’s turn. I will be going to her viewing today, later this afternoon. The next few days around here is going to be tough. Pray for my Father, his family, and especially me. I got little or not sleep last night. So, I am going to feeling rough a little later.

But, this is not about me at all. Is about my family. Pray for peace, pray for unity — above all — just pray.

I will be gone for the rest of the afternoon, comments will go on moderate till I return.

 

The Saturday Night Music Express – Special Memorial Edition – Presents: Stone Temple Pilots

Los Angeles (CNN) — Aaron Swartz, an Internet savant who at a young age shaped the online era by co-developing RSS and Reddit and later became a digital activist, has committed suicide, a relative told CNN Saturday.
He was 26 years old.

A prodigy, Swartz was behind some of the Internet’s iconic moments, soaring to heights that many developers only dream of. At the same time, he was plagued by legal problems arising from his aggressive activism, and he was also known to suffer depression, a personal matter that he publicly revealed on his blog.

Related:

Others: AlterNetMashable!GuardianThe Daily CallerThe VergeVentureBeatTowleroad News #gayThe Raw Story and Gothamist,  New York TimesHullabalooAlthouseGuardian and Brad DeLong,  Crooked TimberThe AgonistThe Atlantic OnlineGuardianBalloon JuiceThe Lede,Le·gal In·sur·rec· tionGawkerTechCrunchAlthouse and Lessig Blog, v2The Reality-Based Community (Memeorandum)

The Friday Night Music Express, Special Memorial Edition Presents: Ray Stevens

This is for the children, that we lost.

I’ll be back tomorrow.

The Thursday Morning Music Express Presents: Dave Brubeck

I will not lie to my readers, Jazz is really not my thing. I am a rock and roller. However, I always show mad respect to the great ones in music. Jazz is an American thing, and we invented it, and people overseas wanted to sound like us. This was back, when America was a great Nation and people around the world wanted to be like us.

Enjoy the music:

Dave Brubeck, the pianist and composer who helped make jazz popular again in the 1950s and ’60s with recordings like “Time Out,” the first jazz album to sell a million copies, and “Take Five,” the still instantly recognizable hit single that was that album’s centerpiece, died on Wednesday in Norwalk, Conn. He would have turned 92 on Thursday.

He died while on his way to a cardiology appointment, Russell Gloyd, his producer, conductor and manager for 36 years, said. Mr. Brubeck lived in Wilton, Conn.

In a long and successful career, Mr. Brubeck brought a distinctive mixture of experimentation and accessibility that won over listeners who had been trained to the sonic dimensions of the three-minute pop single.

Mr. Brubeck experimented with time signatures and polytonality and explored musical theater and the oratorio, baroque compositional devices and foreign modes. He did not always please the critics, who often described his music as schematic, bombastic and — a word he particularly disliked — stolid. But his very stubbornness and strangeness — the blockiness of his playing, the oppositional push-and-pull between his piano and Paul Desmond’s alto saxophone — make the Brubeck quartet’s best work still sound original.

Outside of the group’s most famous originals, which had the charm and durability of pop songs ( “Blue Rondo à la Turk,” “It’s a Raggy Waltz” and “Take Five”), some of its best work was in its overhauls of standards like “You Go to My Head,” “All the Things You Are” and “Pennies From Heaven.” — Source

Others Remembering — Left and Right: BBCGothamistLos Angeles TimesThe Maddow BlogGawkerTruthdigStinqueThe WeekBlazing Cat FurBalloon Juice and AlthouseThe Atlantic OnlineLos Angeles TimesOutside the BeltwayGimme NoiseThe Democratic DailyThe ReactionPower Line and The Volokh ConspiracyFIRST DRAFT

In Loving Memory: Ada Arlene Quinn

I just recently lost a family member and I got permission from her daughter Sandy to post this tribute.

arlene

Ada Arlene Quinn – My second cousin or my grandfather’s, Brother’s Daughter

Arlene, as we called her,was my Grandfather’s Brother’s Daughter. This would be on my Mother’s side of the family.  She was born on August 30, 1946 and passed away on October 8, 2012. She was one of the strongest women than I know, outside of my own Mother. I will always remember the kindness that she and her parents, showed to my family, when we would go to Dalton, Georgia every year.

This music video, which happens to be a personal favorite of mine, is dedicated to her, and the legacy of love that she leaves with her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Rest in peace, Arlene and save me a place at the throne; I will be with you in a little while. Angel

My continued prayers for the Quinn family, during this very difficult time.

Here’s the video:

Breaking News: Arlen Specter has died

Some sad news to report on a Sunday.

NBC News Politics:

220px-Arlen_Specter,_official_Senate_photo_portraitFormer U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, the Republican-turned-Democrat who played a key role in many Supreme Court nominations, has died. He was 82.

His son Shanin Specter says his father died Sunday morning at his home in Philadelphia, from complications of non-Hodgkins lymphoma. He had battled cancer and other health problems.

Specter served 30 years in the Senate, a Pennsylvania record.

In April 2009, he startled fellow senators when he announced he was switching to the Democratic side because he did not think he could win the nomination for a sixth term in the increasingly conservative GOP. He wound up losing the 2010 Democratic primary to then-Rep. Joe Sestak, who narrowly lost Specter’s seat to conservative Pat Toomey

 

 

I will not write negatively about someone who has died. The man stood for what he believed in. In the wave of the Tea Party movement, Spector became a pariah. Something I know too well about. He tried switching sides, and was not wanted. Spector was from a different era, when politics and Conservatism were not as ugly as they have become in this new era of Sound Bites, and new media.

May he rest in peace, and my prayers to him family in this hour of mourning. Praying

Update: Kudos to the commenters over at DailyKos for showing some serious class on this subject. Applause

Racial Realist and Scientist J.P. Rushton has died

John Derbyshire at VDare Remembers him:

I never met Rushton, but I read his book about 12 years ago, and it seemed like the work of a conscientious researcher.  There are 29 pages of references ─ well over 700, the majority to scholarly journals.

If Rushton left one big idea behind, it was surely the Rule of Three.  A large number of quantifiable physiometric, psychometric, and behavioral indices (he said) show the population mean for white Europeans falling between those for East Asians and sub-Saharan Africans.  

His book is full of substantiating data, and the Rule of Three anyway agrees with common observation and with racial outcomes worldwide, past and present.  I’d be surprised to find Rushton proven wrong on the Rule of Three, and to the best of my knowledge he hasn’t been.

If that’s correct, Rushton added something to our stock of understanding.  That’s what scholars are supposed to do.  So the case against Rushton, point’n’sputter aside, is . . . what?

Like the rest of us, though, Rushton was not infallible.  At 0m10shere he argues that the “click” languages of (mostly) southern Africa have no vowels.

That is nonsense.  Indeed, East !Xoon, a click language, has the most vowel sounds of any language on earth: either 24 (Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language) or 26 (Wikipedia), if you include all glottalized, pharyngealized, nasalized, and murmured variants.

It is in fact an odd thing about languages that those spoken by the most civilizationally primitive peoples often have the most complex phonologies and grammars.  In the language of the Torres Straits, between Australia and Papua New Guinea, the verb has six tenses (remote future, today future, present, today past, recent past, remote past) and three aspects (perfective, imperfective, habitual), not to mention four numbers (singular, dual, specific plural, animate active plural),  two voices (active and attainative), and two moods (indicative and imperative).  

A while back, I took some serious heat for defending Derbyshire. I still do, I didn’t agree with one part of his controversial piece, but, overall it was fairly accurate. I also felt that National Review were absolute cowards for firing Derby, as he is called. There is a difference between racial hatred and racial realism. I believe that there is a difference and Derby knows the difference.

There are some of the so-called “right” who would call me a racist for even saying that I support him. I have one thing to say to them; in the words of the late, great, William F. Buckley, himself a racial realist as well:

Cancel your own goddamned subscription. :mad:

and…. something to view:

The Gravesite of my late cousin, Michael Landon Hill. Shot and left to die in a backyard, by the Detroit Police in 1994. His offense? Basically…. Being White.

Now call me a racist some more, you ignorant pieces of dung.

The Sunday Afternoon Music Express – Special Memorial Edition Presents: The McGuire Sisters

PHOENIX – Dorothy McGuire of the popular 1950s musical trio the McGuire Sisters has died at age 84.
Daughter-in-law Karen Williamson says McGuire died of natural causes at her son’s Phoenix-area home on Friday.
McGuire teamed up with her sisters Phyllis and Christine to earn six gold records for hits like “Sincerely” and “Sugartime.”
The sisters began singing together at their mother’s Ohio church and then performed at weddings and church revivals. They got their big break on Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts show in 1952 where they continued to perform for seven years.
They stopped touring in the late 1960s but reunited in the 1980s and last performed together in the mid-2000s.
She’s survived by her two sisters, her husband of 53 years, Lowell Williamson, two sons and two step-children.— via Fox News

The Late Night Music Express presents: The Doobie Brothers

This is a special memorial edition.  The Doobie Brothers have suffered a loss.

…and there are so many more, I would post them all. But this blog entry would go on for pages.

Anyhow, here’s the official news: (H/T The Detroit Free Press)

March 13,2012—Sonoma CA—Longtime Doobie Brothers drummer Mike Hossack passed away peacefully yesterday March 12 at his home in Dubois, Wyoming after a long battle with cancer he was 65.  Doobie Brothers manager Bruce Cohn made the announcement. [PHOTOS]

“Mike was a one-of-a kind guy and a long-time member of the Doobie Brothers,” remembers Cohn. “He was a fighter and fought the big battle with cancer and he was a close personal friend of mine and I speak for Mike’s family and the entire band when I say he will be greatly missed.”

The Doobie Brothers Tom Johnston remembered Hossack, “Mike has always been a part of my musical life and the life of the Doobie Brothers; from our earliest singles, like China Grove and Blackwater to our most recent single Brighter Day.   He was an incredible musician, a studio quality drummer.  The last few years, he was brave and determined to keep on playing in the face of ill health, and I will always admire him for that.  He was a terrific dad and family man, and we will all miss him.”

The Doobie’s Pat Simmons, who was a close friend of Hossack’s, said, “When my kids were little, they used to call him Big Mike, because to them he was such a big guy.  But to me and those who knew him, he had an even a bigger heart.  We were friends for 43 years and we shared some wonderful adventures together, times I will never forget.  Thanks for all those wonderful memories Mike, and all the great music. We love you.”

Michael Hossack was born in Paterson, New Jersey on October 17, 1946 (a real baby boomer). At age twelve Mike started playing drums in the Little Falls Cadets, a Boy Scout Drum and Bugle Corp. He credits his drum instructors, Joe Whelan (Little Falls Cadets), Bob Peterson (Our Lady of Lourdes Cadets), and George Tuttle (Fair Lawn Cadets) for teaching him the disciplines of playing with other drummers.

Thanks for the music Mike. Rest in peace. :( :cry:

Prayers for the members and past members of The Doobie Brothers and The Hossack Family.

Get the Music, I am sure the guys could use the help right now:

Click here to get ALL of the Doobie Brothers Catalog