Interesting Reading: How the U.S. Bankrupted the Big 3

A man by the name of Curt Brockhaus sent me an email about a book that he has written. It’s a web book and it has a good deal of video and pictures about the history of the automotive industry in it. It makes for very interesting reading, especially for history buffs like me.

Please, click here to check out How the U.S. Bankrupted the Big 3.

Saturday Afternoon at the Movies: Tomorrow We Live (1942)

Please note: I pulled the previous movie posting, because, quite frankly, I didn’t like it. This one is much, much better.

A 1942 film directed by Edgar G. Ulmer, starring Jean Parker and Ricardo Cortez.

His hobby was collecting women… and he called himself the Ghost… the guy they couldn’t kill
Julie Bronson (Jean Parker), whose father, “Pop” Bronson (Emmett Lynn) operates a desert café, is attracting the unwanted attention of a half-crazed gangster known as The Ghost (Ricardo Cortez).

Director:
Edgar G. Ulmer

Writer:
Bart Lytton (original story)

Stars:
Ricardo Cortez, Jean Parker, Emmett Lynn

(Via MrFilmschatten YouTube Page)

The Friday Night Music Express Presents: The Boston Symphony Orchestra

I am including this because of this historic day and anniversary.

Via UpWorthy:

President Kennedy was a transformational leader, and it’s hard to imagine what it felt like to hear of his assassination 50 years ago today. Kennedy was shot as the Boston Symphony Orchestra was about to begin its regular Friday afternoon concert. When word of his death reached the hall a few minutes later, the audience was already seated, oblivious to the world-changing events happening in Dallas.

In a powerful — and stunningly level-headed — decision, the orchestra’s music director, Erich Leinsdorf, sent librarian William Shisler to get the music for the funeral march from Beethoven’s “Eroica” symphony. Shisler quickly distributed the music onstage, letting the musicians know what had happened.

This recording, from WGBH in Boston, begins when Leinsdorf takes the stage to announce the terrible news to the audience and captures the BSO’s heart-rending performance of the Beethoven symphony — a work they found out they were playing only minutes before.

ORIGINAL: By Erich Leinsdorf and the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Originally broadcast on WGBH and found on Time. You can hear the full introduction from the radio broadcast in WGBH’s archives.

Again, may we never forget; and never forget who did this.

Videos: 50 years ago today – The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy

It is quite hard to believe that one of the worst tragedies in the United States of America happened 50 years ago today — The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Much ink will be spilled this day; and I must say, much of it is well done.

However, as a history buff, I believe the best way to remember, is to go back and watch the event, as it happened.

The first breaking report by Walter Cronkite:

The news as it broke on ABC Radio:

Coverage from all the major networks:

ABC TV’s two hour coverage of it:

A stunned New York reacts:

Reactions from many major states:

Martin Luther King Jr’s reaction, who would join him in death in 1968:

A documentary:

May we never forget. :(

The most important thing to remember about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1964

Is this right here:

There will be a lot of retrospective stuff published today, and I suspect that much of it will either omit or distort one key fact—Lee Harvey Oswald, the man who killed President Kennedy, was a leftwing nut job; he was a communist.

via 22 November, 1963 | hogewash.

The Sunday Night Music Express Presents: Gordon Lightfoot

This posting is dedicated to the the 29 men who lost their lives on the Edmund Fitzgerald lake freighter 38 years ago. May they rest in peace.

As the winds of November whipped through a park beside the Detroit River, 29 lanterns flickered at the water’s edge and bagpipes wailed as about 60 people gathered Sunday evening to remember the 29 men who lost their lives on the Edmund Fitzgerald lake freighter 38 years ago.

“It’s appropriate to have this here because the ship was built 1,000 yards south, and it unloaded all the time 1,000 yards north,” said Tom Abair, 62, codirector of the River Rouge Historical Museum.

In a heated tent set up beside the park’s lighthouse, Abair and other museum volunteers displayed mural-size photos and a model of the famed ore carrier that sank in Lake Superior on Nov. 10, 1975, in a gale. Source: The Detroit Free Press

Lyrics:

The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
of the big lake they called “Gitche Gumee”
The lake, it is said, never gives up her dead
when the skies of November turn gloomy
With a load of iron ore twenty-six thousand tons more
than the Edmund Fitzgerald weighed empty,
that big ship and true was a bone to be chewed
when the Gales of November came early

The ship was the pride of the American side
coming back from some mill in Wisconsin
As the big freighters go, it was bigger than most
with a crew and good captain well seasoned,
concluding some terms with a couple of steel firms
when they left fully loaded for Cleveland
And later that night when the ship’s bell rang,
could it be the north wind they’d been feelin’?

The wind in the wires made a tattle-tale sound
and a wave broke over the railing
And ev’ry man knew, as the captain did too
’twas the witch of November come stealin’
The dawn came late and the breakfast had to wait
when the Gales of November came slashin’
When afternoon came it was freezin’ rain
in the face of a hurricane west wind

When suppertime came the old cook came on deck sayin’
“Fellas, it’s too rough t’feed ya”
At seven P.M. a main hatchway caved in; he said,
“Fellas, it’s bin good t’know ya!”
The captain wired in he had water comin’ in
and the good ship and crew was in peril
And later that night when ‘is lights went outta sight
came the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald

Does any one know where the love of God goes
when the waves turn the minutes to hours?
The searchers all say they’d have made Whitefish Bay
if they’d put fifteen more miles behind ‘er
They might have split up or they might have capsized;
they may have broke deep and took water
And all that remains is the faces and the names
of the wives and the sons and the daughters

Lake Huron rolls, Superior sings
in the rooms of her ice-water mansion
Old Michigan steams like a young man’s dreams;
the islands and bays are for sportsmen
And farther below Lake Ontario
takes in what Lake Erie can send her,
And the iron boats go as the mariners all know
with the Gales of November remembered

In a musty old hall in Detroit they prayed,
in the Maritime Sailors’ Cathedral
The church bell chimed ’til it rang twenty-nine times
for each man on the Edmund Fitzgerald
The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down
of the big lake they call “Gitche Gumee”
“Superior,” they said, “never gives up her dead
when the gales of November come early”

Photo of the Day: Rosie the Router: 1942

Rosie the Router: 1942

December 1942. “Mary Miller, operator of a router at the Boeing plant in Seattle, drills holes in a part for a new B-17F (Flying Fortress) bomber. The Flying Fortress, a four-engine heavy bomber capable of flying at high altitudes, has performed with great credit in the South Pacific, over Germany and elsewhere.” Photo by Andreas Feininger for the Office of War Information

View full size @ Shorpy Blog

Photo of the Day: Detroit 1917 – Please-Freeze

Back when Detroit was worth a darn; unlike now.

Please-Freeze: 1917

Detroit circa 1917. “Ice fountain, Washington Boulevard.” The big icicle with a small request, discreetly stated on that unobtrusive little sign near the man: PLEASE. The rest of the message is up to your imagination.

View full size @ Shorpy Blog